Every Elixir

Sammi/21/Midwest USA.

I am a lover of all things artful and smart, diverse and raw. I feel, think, love, and live intensely. I have sometimes been destroyed by my tendency to over-commit, but I value nothing more than this violently passionate, unendingly tragic, and unfashionably complex manner of existence.
I will one day be free from my own faults and insecurities, but until then I will collect what moves me to break into such independence through this blog. Things seen here are not mine unless I say otherwise. What you see is my way of chronicling this untitled journey, nothing more. nothing less.
nickdrake:

nikola tesla
In 1909, Guglielmo Marconi was awarded a Nobel Prize for his  development of radio. From this point on, the history books began to  refer to him as “the father of radio.” In fact, radio had many  inventors, not the least of which was Nikola Tesla. But Marconi was now a  wealthy man and Tesla was penniless.
“My enemies have been so successful in portraying me as a  poet and a visionary,” said Tesla, “that I must put out something  commercial without delay.”
In 1912, Tesla tested a revolutionary new kind of turbine  engine. Both Westinghouse Manufacturing and the General Electric Company  had spent millions developing bladed turbine designs, which were  essentially powerful windmills in a housing. Tesla’s design was  something altogether different. In it, a series of closely spaced discs  were keyed to a shaft. With only one moving part, Tesla’s design was of  ideal simplicity, much like the AC motor he had invented years earlier.  Fuels such as steam or vaporized gas were injected into the spaces  between the discs, spinning the motor at a high rate of speed. In fact,  the turbine operated at such high revolutions to the minute that the  metal in the discs distorted from the heat. Eventually, Tesla abandoned  the project.
With no great prospects to speak of, Tesla began visiting the  local parks more often, rescuing injured pigeons, and often taking them  back to his hotel room to nurse them. Years later, when he lived at the  Hotel New Yorker, he had the hotel chef prepare a special mix of seed  for his pigeons, which he hoped to sell commercially. Naturally, this  prompted speculation about his mental well-being. His aversion to germs  also heightened in this period, and he began to wash his hands  compulsively and would eat only boiled foods.
In spite of his growing eccentricity, fruitful ideas  continued to spring from his imagination. At the beginning of World War  I, Tesla described a means for detecting ships at sea. His idea was to  transmit high-frequency radio waves that would reflect off the hulls of  vessels and appear on a fluorescent screen. The idea was too far ahead  of its day, but it was one of the first descriptions of what we now call  radar. Tesla was also the first to warn of an era when flying vehicles  without wings could be remotely controlled to land with an explosive  charge on an unsuspecting enemy.
In 1922, at sixty-five years of age, Tesla still dressed  impeccably. Yet friends observed that his clothing, like his scientific  theories, now appeared old-fashioned. He managed to make a living by  working as a consulting engineer, but more often than not he delivered  plans that his clients deemed impractical.
During this period, Tesla spoke out vehemently against the  new theories of Albert Einstein, insisting that energy is not contained  in matter, but in the space between the particles of an atom.
In the late 1920s, Tesla began to develop a friendship with  George Sylvester Viereck, a well-known German poet and mystic. Though  nearly a recluse, Tesla occasionally attended dinner parties held by  Viereck and his wife. Competitive by nature, Tesla wrote a strange poem  that he dedicated to his friend. It was called “Fragments of Olympian  Gossip” and poked vitriolic fun at the scientific establishment of the  day.
Tesla’s business with the U. S. Patent Office was still not  finished.  In 1928, at the age of seventy-two, he received his last  patent, number 6,555,114, “Apparatus For Aerial Transportation.” This  brilliantly designed flying machine resembled both a helicopter and an  airplane. According to the inventor, the device would weigh  eight-hundred pounds. It would rise from a garage, a roof, or a window  as desired, and would sell at $1,000 for both military and consumer  uses. This novel invention was the progenitor of today’s tiltrotor or  VSTOL (vertical short takeoff and landing) plane. Unfortunately, Tesla  never had the money to build a prototype.

nickdrake:

nikola tesla

In 1909, Guglielmo Marconi was awarded a Nobel Prize for his development of radio. From this point on, the history books began to refer to him as “the father of radio.” In fact, radio had many inventors, not the least of which was Nikola Tesla. But Marconi was now a wealthy man and Tesla was penniless.

“My enemies have been so successful in portraying me as a poet and a visionary,” said Tesla, “that I must put out something commercial without delay.”

In 1912, Tesla tested a revolutionary new kind of turbine engine. Both Westinghouse Manufacturing and the General Electric Company had spent millions developing bladed turbine designs, which were essentially powerful windmills in a housing. Tesla’s design was something altogether different. In it, a series of closely spaced discs were keyed to a shaft. With only one moving part, Tesla’s design was of ideal simplicity, much like the AC motor he had invented years earlier. Fuels such as steam or vaporized gas were injected into the spaces between the discs, spinning the motor at a high rate of speed. In fact, the turbine operated at such high revolutions to the minute that the metal in the discs distorted from the heat. Eventually, Tesla abandoned the project.

With no great prospects to speak of, Tesla began visiting the local parks more often, rescuing injured pigeons, and often taking them back to his hotel room to nurse them. Years later, when he lived at the Hotel New Yorker, he had the hotel chef prepare a special mix of seed for his pigeons, which he hoped to sell commercially. Naturally, this prompted speculation about his mental well-being. His aversion to germs also heightened in this period, and he began to wash his hands compulsively and would eat only boiled foods.

In spite of his growing eccentricity, fruitful ideas continued to spring from his imagination. At the beginning of World War I, Tesla described a means for detecting ships at sea. His idea was to transmit high-frequency radio waves that would reflect off the hulls of vessels and appear on a fluorescent screen. The idea was too far ahead of its day, but it was one of the first descriptions of what we now call radar. Tesla was also the first to warn of an era when flying vehicles without wings could be remotely controlled to land with an explosive charge on an unsuspecting enemy.

In 1922, at sixty-five years of age, Tesla still dressed impeccably. Yet friends observed that his clothing, like his scientific theories, now appeared old-fashioned. He managed to make a living by working as a consulting engineer, but more often than not he delivered plans that his clients deemed impractical.

During this period, Tesla spoke out vehemently against the new theories of Albert Einstein, insisting that energy is not contained in matter, but in the space between the particles of an atom.

In the late 1920s, Tesla began to develop a friendship with George Sylvester Viereck, a well-known German poet and mystic. Though nearly a recluse, Tesla occasionally attended dinner parties held by Viereck and his wife. Competitive by nature, Tesla wrote a strange poem that he dedicated to his friend. It was called “Fragments of Olympian Gossip” and poked vitriolic fun at the scientific establishment of the day.

Tesla’s business with the U. S. Patent Office was still not finished. In 1928, at the age of seventy-two, he received his last patent, number 6,555,114, “Apparatus For Aerial Transportation.” This brilliantly designed flying machine resembled both a helicopter and an airplane. According to the inventor, the device would weigh eight-hundred pounds. It would rise from a garage, a roof, or a window as desired, and would sell at $1,000 for both military and consumer uses. This novel invention was the progenitor of today’s tiltrotor or VSTOL (vertical short takeoff and landing) plane. Unfortunately, Tesla never had the money to build a prototype.

(via davidcowles)

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