Every Elixir

Sammi/21/Midwest USA.

I am a lover of all things artful and smart, diverse and raw. I feel, think, love, and live intensely. I have sometimes been destroyed by my tendency to over-commit, but I value nothing more than this violently passionate, unendingly tragic, and unfashionably complex manner of existence.
I will one day be free from my own faults and insecurities, but until then I will collect what moves me to break into such independence through this blog. Things seen here are not mine unless I say otherwise. What you see is my way of chronicling this untitled journey, nothing more. nothing less.

ignis fatuus (medieval latin: “foolish fire”), commonly known as will-o’-the-wisp, is an atmospheric ghost light seen by travelers at night, especially over bogs, swamps or marshes. It resembles a flickering lamp and is said to recede if approached, drawing travelers from the safe paths. In European folklore, these lights are held to be either mischievous spirits of the dead, or other supernatural beings or spirits such as fairies, attempting to lead travelers astray. In literature, it sometimes has a metaphorical meaning, describing a hope or goal that leads one on but is impossible to reach, or something one finds sinister and confounding.

(Source: kierenwwalker)

mythology meme  ─  [2/10] books based on mythology

Le Morte d’Arthur (originally spelled Le Morte Darthur, Middle French for “the death of Arthur”) is a compilation by Sir Thomas Malory of Romance tales about the legendary King Arthur, Guinevere, Lancelot, and the Knights of the Round Table. The book interprets existing French and English stories about these figures, with some of Malory’s own original material. First published in 1485 by William Caxton, Le Morte d’Arthur is perhaps the best-known work of English-language Arthurian literature today. Many modern Arthurian writers have used Malory as their principal source, including T. H. White for his popular The Once and Future King and Tennyson for The Idylls of the King.

suammetuit:

Ἀφροδίτη - is the Greek goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. Her Roman equivalent is the goddess Venus. She was born from the foam of the sea.

“Do you not see what a great goddess Aphrodite is? She whom you can neither name nor measure, how great she is by nature from how great a thing she comes through. She nourishes you and me and all the mortals. And as proof, so that you might not only comprehend this in words, I will show you by deed, the strength of the goddess. On the one hand earth desires rain when the dry barren ground is in need of moisture on account of drought; and on the other hand, the revered sky, when it is filled with rain by Aphrodite, desires that it fall on the earth; and when the two mingle into the same thing, they beget everything for us, and at the same time, they nurture everything through which the mortal race lives and grows.” – Euripides frag. 898

disa:

Mythology Meme || (6/10) Women of the Norse Pantheon

Hail, Huntress whose arrows fly truest,  Hail, Cold One whose heart beats blue fire beneath your breast of snow.  Hail Skadi, whose tracks lead us beyond the white cold,  into memory, into forgetting, into slow sleep.

disa:

Mythology Meme || (6/10) Women of the Norse Pantheon

Hail, Huntress whose arrows fly truest,
Hail, Cold One whose heart beats blue fire
beneath your breast of snow. 
Hail Skadi, whose tracks lead us beyond the white cold,
into memory, into forgetting, into slow sleep.

mythology meme  ─  [2/9] greek gods/goddesses

Chronos (Ancient Greek: Χρόνος) in pre-Socratic philosophical works is said to be the personification of time. Chronos was imagined as an incorporeal god. Serpentine in form, with three heads—that of a man, a bull, and a lion. He and his consort, serpentine Ananke (inevitability), circled the primal world-egg in their coils and split it apart to form the ordered universe of earth, sea and sky. He is not to be confused with the Titan Cronus. He was depicted in Greco-Roman mosaics as a man turning the Zodiac Wheel. Chronos is usually portrayed through an old, wise man with a long, gray beard, such as “Father Time”. 

luscifers:

★. mythological figures // pt. i: christianity;

Lucifer:

"How you have fallen from heaven, morning star, son of the dawn! You have been cast down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations! You said in your heart, ‘I will ascend to the heavens; I will raise my throne above the stars of God; I will sit enthroned on the mount of assembly, on the utmost heights of Mount Zaphon. I will ascend above the tops of the clouds; I will make myself like the Most High.’ But you are brought down to the realm of the dead, to the depths of the pit. Those who see you stare at you, they ponder your fate: ‘Is this the man who shook the earth and made kingdoms tremble, the man who made the world a wilderness, who overthrew its cities and would not let his captives go home?’"
disa:

Mythology Meme || (10/10) Women of the Norse Pantheon

Hail to Sigyn, devoted wife and mother Comforter to the forsaken She, who embodies patience, and braves all unearned scorn. (x)

disa:

Mythology Meme || (10/10) Women of the Norse Pantheon

Hail to Sigyn, devoted wife and mother
Comforter to the forsaken
She, who embodies patience,
and braves all unearned scorn. (x)

mythology meme  ─  [3/9] greek gods/goddesses

Nyx (Ancient Greek: Νύξ, “night”) is the Greek goddess (or personification) of the night. A shadowy figure, Nyx stood at or near the beginning of creation, and was the mother of other personified gods such as Hypnos (sleep) and Thánatos (death). Her appearances in mythology are sparse, but reveal her as a figure of exceptional power and beauty. She is found in the shadows of the world and only ever seen in glimpses.

suammetuit:

mythology alphabet: t - tartarus [(Greek: Τάρταρος)], in ancient Greek mythology, is the deep abyss that is used as a dungeon of torment and suffering for the wicked and as the prison for the Titans. As far below Hades as the earth is below the heavens, Tartarus is the place where souls were judged after death and where the wicked received punishment.